1. the waitomo caves of new zealand’s northern island, formed two million years ago from the surrounding limestone bedrock, are home to an endemic species of bioluminescent fungus gnat (arachnocampa luminosa, or glow worm fly) who in their larval stage produce silk threads from which to hang and, using a blue light emitted from a modified excretory organ in their tails, lure in prey who then become ensnared in sticky droplets of mucus.

    photos from spellbound waitomo tours, forevergone, blue polaris, and martin rietze. (more cave photos) (more bioluminescence photos)

    (via realmonstrosities)

     
  2. leafyears:

    Baby snake i caught!

    (via realmonstrosities)

     
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  5. interface2000:

    darksilenceinsuburbia:

    Tamsin van Essen

    Erosion Series

    This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.

    would be fun to climb

    (via canisalbus)

     
  6. natgeofound:

    A well-worn stairway leads to a house on Oahu’s North Shore, November 1979.Photograph by Robert Madden, National Geographic

    (via bohemianhomes)

     
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  10. oakapples:

    This afternoon I went to a talk about structural colour in Hibiscus, during which I remembered about these Lamproderma slime moulds that also display this phenomenon (although with a different physical basis). Many species are restricted to the snow-line in montane Europe. Beautiful things.

    (via realmonstrosities)

     
  11. coolsciencegifs:

    See-through skin

    A ‘vein-viewer' works by using infrared light to image the presence of veins underneath the skin: The IR light is absorbed by the deoxygenated haemoglobin within veins. The locations of absorption and reflection are detected and the machine generates a corresponding projection using visible light. Find out more about how these devices are used in medicine in this video: http://youtu.be/lk0HMqwreIo

    (via @rossexton)

    (via anniilaugh)

     
  12. thebeatswitness:

    Ernst Haas:Himalayan Pilgrimage 

    (via canisalbus)

     
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